How to Fix Water That Keeps Running in a Tub Faucet

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Step 1

Turn off the water to the tub faucet by closing the valves in the wall (accessed through a panel behind the wall on which the faucet is mounted) or by turning off the home’s water main near the water meter.

Step 2

Pull the cap off the top of the faucet handle and unscrew the Allen-head screw under it. If your faucet doesn’t have a cap, it will have a set screw on the side of the handle. Find the screw and remove it with an Allen wrench.

Step 3

Take the handle off the faucet head and look for a small retainer clip around the edge of the cartridge underneath. Use a pair of pliers to remove this clip. If there is a bonnet cap or washer, loosen and remove this either by hand or with a pair of pliers.

Step 4

Slide the cartridge out of the faucet head and install a new cartridge in place of the old one. Press it to the back of the faucet head and then fit the clip around it to secure it, or reinstall the washer to hold it in place.

Step 5

Put the handle back on the stem of the cartridge and fasten it with the set screw to hold it in place. Turn on the water and test the faucet.

How to Fix a Stinky Sink

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First, make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without a P-trap, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it’s not detectable.

Also make sure there is a proper vent for the sink. Even with a P-trap, if there’s nowhere for back-flowing gases to go, they’ll bubble up past the trap. (And even if you don’t have a vent, that might be OK.)

One more thing it could be is the overflow drain. Depending on the design of sink, the overflow can hold a small amount of water at the bottom where it T’s in to the main drain, which can become stagnant. Run water down the drain and you’ll force some air up the overflow (to make way for the water coming down), which will have that stagnant smell.

To diagnose this, plug the sink and begin filling it; you shouldn’t get any musty smell at first because there’s no air movement. Once the water level hits the overflow drain, you will start smelling the musty smell for a while because the water is displacing the gas, which wants to rise above the water and so will move up into the bathroom. If this is the problem, you can ameliorate it with some foaming pipe snake; pour it down the overflow drain and it will clean out any caked-on gunk which contributes to the smell, and which may be trapping the water. The real fix is to make sure there’s no “damming” effect of construction defects at the bottom of the overflow drain (a lip of porcelain, issues where the overflow meets the metal drain downpipe, etc).

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn’t go down the drain)?

┬áIf so, it’s something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside. Also, look in the barrel of the faucet and clean it out if you can. And of course you can also consider replacing the faucet.

If this doesn’t work, it’s something in the basin, drain, trap, or overflow drain. KeithS has some good answers above, but I also recommend the following:

– Take out the drain stopper and look down the drain pipe for gunk. Clean it out with a snake or unraveled coat hanger if you can.

– Spray bleach down the drain and overflow drain to kill anything nasty in there. You can bleach the basin too for cleanliness.

– Get a large bowl or 1-5 gallon bucket. Fill it with water. Quickly but carefully pour all the water down the drain. The goal is to fill the basin and displace all/any water in the overflow drain and trap. Sometimes there can be nasty things in there that float so they don’t go through the trap, and this forces them out the drain pipe.

Dangerous Water Valves

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A gate valve for a property usually has to be closed if plumbing repairs or maintenance are needed inside the building. In some instances, particularly if the main control valve is a gate type valve, the valve may not close completely. In many cases a gate valve repair or replacement may be needed. But many times other remedies are available.

A gate valve not closing completely is typically due to sediment that has built up inside the body of the valve. The sediment becomes lodged between the gate that lowers, and the inside of the valve body itself. Ball type valves do not suffer from this problem, as they operate on a different principal than a gate that raises and lowers inside of the valve body .

The typical reaction when a gate valve will not close fully is to exert addition force on the handle. Using force to close a valve is absolutely the wrong response. Brute force can cause permanent damage to the valve and a loss of water supply to the building.

Leaking Air Gaps

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The simplicity of the air gap not only makes for an elegantly effective device, it also means there are fewer opportunities for malfunction. But that isn’t to say things can’t go wrong:

  • The most common issue with air gaps is a blockage somewhere along the line, usually due to bits of food and grease accumulating over some time. These kinds of blockages are most likely to be found in the hose between the air gap and drain/disposal (where there’s less pressure to move things along). When a blockage becomes large enough, water coming out of the dishwasher will begin to back up, spilling out of the air gap into the sink basin. Try disconnecting the hose and flushing it out.
  • If a blockage can’t be found in the hoses, there could be something inside the air gap itself – a bottle or pipe brush may be handy in clearing out the unit. If that doesn’t solve the problem, it’s possible the blockage lies past the hoses: in the the disposal itself, or the trap(s) under the sink. While you would probably notice such a clog well before the dishwasher brought it to your attention, this would be the last obvious place to look. Remove the p-trap and clean out any blockages.
  • Ensure that there are no kinks in the hose(s), and that no length is too long; there should be little slack when all is said and done. There should be just enough hose to get to the air gap inlet (or reach the highest point under the counter if using a high loop), and just enough to reach the drain or garbage disposal. The final run of the hose to the drain/disposal needs to be free of any sagging “traps” resulting from excess length, in which debris can accumulate and cause a blockage.
  • If the dishwasher is connected to a garbage disposal and constantly spits water from the air gap during draining, it’s possible that the knockout plug on the disposal inlet was never knocked out. It happens! Disconnect the power supply, and use a screwdriver and hammer to punch it out. A pair of long-nose pliers will be helpful in fishing out the plastic plug from the disposal.
  • Avoid using standard corrugated, plastic hoses – they’re easier to damage than high quality rubber hoses, and the ridges inside are perfect for accumulating debris, which can lead to a clogged line.